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to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do not think it goes far enough. i think it was greenspan that i heard last week said in a discussion panel that a recession as a result of going over the fiscal slope would be a small price to pay to pay back all the
, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernible] >> it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernible] >> i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we ar
is the federal government spending under control. we continue to get closer to this incredible fiscal cliff and i think that the president should take a case study analysis and look at what president coolidge did and jfk, john f. kennedy when they went in and lowered tax rates and increased revenues, which is exactly what we're talking about. >> so either you've got a president who is tremendously overconfident after being reelected or someone who asks for the sty in the first offer knowing that he will look like the compromising once he gives in on the demands and gets himself involved in negotiations. >> both sides are waiting to see who is going to offer up the plan first, we're waiting on the white house. >> it's the president's job, isn't it? congress controls the purse strings and the white house is waiting for-- we're waiting for something from congress on their side and go back and forth, who puts up the offer first and it's the first salvo, so, michigan mcconnell laughs at it and timothy geithner hands it to them. this isn't real. >> i didn't know that first was the first offer. we have
what happens if we go off this fiscal cliff. it's a spending decision and a tax decision, but i list them both up here. this chart comes from the congressional research service. a couple interesting things i want to point out here. first and foremost, if we do nothing, tax increases of about $400 billion, there are going to be spending reductions of about $102 billion, there are some other changes that happen at the end of the year that aren't associated with policy decisions, at the end of the day we change the scope of our deficit by about $607 billion. if we do nothing, that's what makes this such a hard issue to grapple with, mr. speaker, if we do nothing, if we reach no agreement, changes that happen automatically and burden us all in different ways, will create $607 billion for the u.s. treasury that we didn't have before. and that's only half of the annual deficit. you see all the pan damone yum that -- pandemonium folks are describing, all the frightful words used to describe the fiscal cliff, if we roll over that fiscal cliff and all of those bad things come to bear, the tax
moments, a discussion of house spending cuts in the so-called fiscal cliff. in a little less than an hour, more about the fiscal cliff with republican representative tom cole from oklahoma. then the head of fema testifies on capitol hill about the government's response to hurricane sandy. and later, senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff.
federal spending cuts unless congress and the president act so-called fiscal cliff. on the senate floor today, top senate democrat, here he was, harry reid, said the republican counteroffer unveiled yesterday is a serious proposal. reid called the offer a nonstarter. his word. but a serious proposal nonetheless. in an interview just today with bloomberg tv, president obama did not reject the gop offer outright. officials have called it a step backward, not worthy of a counteroffer. but, you know, bottom line here, you have two sides they appear to be pretty far apart with no new negotiations happening at least not to our knowledge. so, with me now from capitol hill is representative peter wel welch. democrat from vermont. good to see you. thanks for coming on. >> thank you. >> so let me just pose this one to you. you just heard harry reid, would you agree with harry reid the plan offered yesterday by that house speaker is, quote unquote, a serious plan? >> well, you know, i don't know the details of it. it is $800 billion supposedly in revenues and it is a lot of medicare cuts but not s
in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't
. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie
are headed here to washington today to tell president obama their thoughts on the fiscal cliff. the bipartisan group says both sides need to work together to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in at the end of the year. >> no one's going to get what they want, but as a country to move forward, we've got to figure out who gives where, and if everything is going to be out on the table, how do we negotiate that? >> reporter: republicans have given a counterproposal to the president's plan which he issued last week. they say their plan would cut $2.2 trillion from the federal deficit over ten years. with $600 billion in health care cuts, $300 billion in cuts to mandatory spending and another $300 billion in cuts to other federal spending. the biggest difference between the republican plan and the president's remains taxes and how the government can generate more revenue to pay down the debt. >> rates have to rise on the top 2%. there's no other way to do it. >> reporter: president obama says his plan will raise taxes on the rich, bringing in $1.6 trillion. republ
's the first part of the fiscal cliff. the second part of it is the spending decrease that this congress and the president agreed to the last summer to say we dramatically increase spending, we have to reduce that spending. that spending decrease that was agreed to had a deadline by the end of this year. if there didn't there would be across the board cuts. the house passed our spending decreases in may. the senate has yet to pass any. with that we're stuck with across-the-board cuts that will be in early january. and the tax rate for all americans. in 2001 and 2003 and then extended during the lame duck of 2010, every americans' tax rates were extended out to expire the 31st of december. every tax rate from the lowest to the highest is set to go up. some people see the problem is we're not taxing enough and so that solves the problem. to just go off the fiscal cliff and everyone will be taxed more. some say we don't take from some group and give to the other. some say go to the clinton tax rate. we had a booming economy and creating more jobs. if increasing taxes increases economic acti
, and spending cuts that many believe would be a fiscal cliff that would kick in on january the 1st. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel is watching it all unfold on capitol hill. what do we know about the visit about the expectations for what might happen during it. >> reporter: martha, timothy geithner arrived here on capitol hill a short time ago to meet first with senate majority leader harry reid. we know he's having individual meetings with the top four leaders of congress. what republicans have said they want to hear, and republicans will be critical, because they need republican support to get any final fiscal cliff deal through the senate, and also through the house, they say they hope that he's coming with concrete spending cut ideas that are acceptable to the administration. one of the meetings today will be with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell who a short time ago sounded pretty fired up. >> the only reason democrats are insisting on raising rates is because raising rates on the so-called rich is the holy grail of liberalism. their aim is not job he tkraoe a
over the fight in the fiscal cliff. americans face crushing tax hikes and severe spending cuts in 27 days if democrats and republicans cannot come together on a deal. by the way, congress breaks for the holidays in ten days. slash that number. in an interview with bloomberg news, the president made it crystal clear he's not about to blink on the issue of tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted against democrats. now we understand there are issues amongst republicans as well. >> that's right. they're in a tough spot here. they don't want to be in left in a position of being blamed for the fiscal cliff. you're seeing a division between house members and senate members. the reason for this is mainly over the 800 billion in new tax revenue. this was part of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed co
cliff, a series of tax hikes and spending cuts that many people think if they go into effect will put the country into recession. yet we heard the treasury secretary tim geithner say the president is willing to see the country go off the fiscal cliff if republicans do not accede to his demands. >> it's probably pretty real. but you can't get to where we need to go by cutting spending, that won't cut it. you're going to destroy a fragile economy. you can't get there by taxing your way into it and you can't grow your way out of this. you have to have a blend. when you have leaders of parties and people from the administration saying i think it will be to the advantage of the democrats to go off the cliff or i think it will be advantage to the republicans to go off the cliff or the president to go off the cliff, that's like betting your country. there's stupidity involved in that. this is big-time stuff. >> let me ask you about a report that some republicans now are perhaps willing to see the tax rates rise to some degree on top earners in exchange for later getting a better deal on some
is spending. no one wants to talk about spending. the fiscal cliff is a bipartisan compromise that would do draconian cuts in the budget they never wanted in the first place. it's foolish to think congress will have a plan to fix things when congress designed the plan they are trying to fix. >> some democrats say entitlements can be on the table but should deal with long-term reform afterwards. here's what senator dick durbin said yesterday on "starting point." >> entitlements need to be part of the long-term strategy but do it in a thoughtful way. i don't want to see major changes decided in the heat of the moment. let's get through the fiscal cliff, find a way to avert it. but at the end of the day treat it as the important program it is for so many millions of americans. >> eric, if we get a deal, how much kicking of the can down the road do you think that deal will inclu include? >> i think it will include significant kicking the can down the road which is why they should kick the entire deal down the road and deal with it together. we know it won't from happen history. we have had 18 o
the fiscal cliff prospect is the commendation of tax increases and spending cuts across the board and how they would have negative impacts. so we need to do it in a smart way. even as we find savings, we need to make targeted investments and we need to do things that help our economy and the long-term. >> [inaudible question] >> it is not specifically designed for that. it is the president's broader approach this. significant savings need to be where we can get them, a trillion plus in the budget control act, an additional $600 billion in savings but ford is part of the proposal. and also revenues from the wealthiest 2%, coupled to make the economy grow. it is stronger growth, stronger job creation. as a principle, deficit reduction done well and done right is positive for the economy. >> on the subject of israel, in the last few weeks, you asked about -- [inaudible] [inaudible question] the u.s. has been very steadfast to stand by israel. i'm wondering in light of that, are there any statements that have gone out in regards to what the president has done to express this and what the isra
if romney didn't win. this fiscal cliff negotiation seems doomed. am i being pessimistic? >> we're basically spending like europeans, but being taxed like americans. at some point you got to decide which you want. basically american government spending now is getting close to norwegian levels. and at that point, you can't have american tax levels. >> brian: what is their level? >> they spend 46% of gdp and people pay that. that's reflected in their taxes. america is basically borrowing $188 million every hour in washington. seven days a week, 24 hours a day, thanksgiving, ramadan, whatever. that gap cannot be closed by sticking to to the rich. >> brian: don't you think the president realizes that or do you think he fully realizes that in. >> oh, yeah, he does. this is the cunning thing. he's going to blame it on the rich, blame it on the republicans. but right now if you're just an average working guy with an average income, your taxes are going to go up because for him -- pour for the president, it's not about the economy. it's about government. it's about the size of government. not the ec
the fiscal cliff. that's called into question the anti-tax pledge republicans have signed. iffer some lawmaker that is means no agreement. >> it is not the norquist pledge but the americans no tax reform pledge and the one thing really keeping republicans -- i don't know what republicans stand for. it looks like for this in washington, it's a host of things. at least the democrats are responsible enough to get loans from china. the republicans want to do it without paying for it without any fiscal discipline. at one point the republicans have to do it -- the pledge was the last they based it on. >> nothing was done, though. that's a bad thing, aaron. >> why? i'm not sure that it is. i'm not sure that this fiscal cliff really is a fiscal cliff. i think that it changes the baseline. republicans get better negotiating position on the other side when they are not scared to death of their own shadow and fearful of not looking reasonable. to think that the same joker who is got us this compromise will somehow get us a better compromise is absolutely silly. some of these guys have been voted
is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> even as the fiscal cliff negotiations drag on in washington, wall street seems to be basically unphased. the dow jones has slipped only about 200 points since the election. why isn't wall street more on edge itself? william cohen is the author of "money and power, hold goldman sachs came to rule the world." the labor department came out with the applications for unemployment aid saying it fell sharply for the last week and stocks basically opened flat this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go
that fiscal cliff house republicans are now offering up a plan of their own to avert that combination of spending cuts and tax hikes. it's set to welcome us all on january 1st if they don't have an agreement. i'm jenna lee. jon: some kind of welcome that would be. i'm jon scott. within hours of seeing the proposal the white house slammed the g.o.p. offer saying quote their plan provides nothing new and provides no details on what deductions they'll limb nature, loopholes they will close or which medicare savings they would achieve. house speaker john boehner inc insists his offer is the best one on the table calling it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. jenna: mike emanuel is with us. certainly a challenge to find this ideal plan. what is holding it up. >> reporter: the chairman of the senate budget committee wants a large come proceed hence i have deal in the range of $5 trillion and says a grand bargain can get done if everybody kaoels cool and doesn't overreact to every valley over the net. he this is a camp david-style summit might help things
spend too much. that's important when we talk about this fiscal cliff, mr. speaker. this is not about a tax issue. this is a spending issue and this is an issue that folks don't have answers to. you and i serve on the budget committee. one of the things i'm most proud of in my two short years in this body is we looked at the tough challenges. the ones that my colleague from virginia described as being tough, tough choices, you're cutting spending. someone's going to be unhappy. probably would have to be a combination of both. we look at those things. we did on the budget committee. and we came up with a solution. we didn't just tell america who to blame. we didn't about how hard it was and how lousy that is for america's children and america's grandchildren. we proposed solutions. it's represented on this chart, mr. speaker. what i have is debt as a percent of fwpped. the federal debt. that's about $16.3 trillion. i go all the way back to world war ii here where debt was 100% of g.d.p. historical debt represented by this gray line, mr. speaker. this red line, just a different represen
the fiscal cliff. is there progress? is there no progress 123 are the democrats giving? have they given? the only thing given that i know is the tablet. that's what i want to spend a moment on while we bemoan is the farce that is washington. one of the worst aspects of this era where we have to hang on the word of every people who frankly aren't actually trying to make us any money, and if anything want to take it from us, is there are companies doing amazing things, soen in the interests of reminds us some companies are doing great things that can make you money, i want to celebrate the products of three terrific companies as well as their stocks, because after all this is "mad money," not mad tablets. first one of my favorses is the column that consequence taply amazes me, david pentagon, the "new york times" writer who opines brilliantly in a can't-miss column about tech products. i love this guy. today's product starts several enough, a segment of an npr-call-in seg meant that he was going to offered opinions, but to quote, all six callers had the same question -- which tablet shoul
hill as the fiscal cliff looms now just 32 days away. house speaker john boehner says no progress has been made in two weeks of talks, and republicans want the white house to come up with significant spending cuts. senate democratic leader harry reid responded to boehner saying, quote, i don't understand his brain, unquote. >>> when those talks over the fiscal cliff seem to be heading towards a stalemate but do the capitol hill theatrics tell the whole story? here's thousand politico summed it up, listen to top democrats and republicans talk on camera and it sounds like they could not be further apart. but behind the scenes top officials who have been involved in the talks for many months say the contours of the deal are starting to take shape. well, joining me are jason johnson a political professor, t and a republican strategist ron bonjene, ron, let's start with you, both sides know they'll have to make a deal. one congressman says to get it there has to look like this was fighting this way it's kind of like managing the public's expectati expectations, oh, we didn't give anything,
the fiscal cliff comes. lawmakers now have less than a month to compromise and to avoid a year-end deadline that would trigger massive spending cuts and tax hikes for just about everybody. behind-the-scenes negotiations at a stalemate. both sides went public yesterday on the sunday morning shows to make their cases. treasury secretary tim geithner predicted republicans would eventually come around to accept a tax increase on the highest earners. >> you think we'll get a deal by the end of the year? >> i do. i do. the only thing standing in the way of that would be a refusal by republicans to accept that rates are going to have to go up on the wealthiest americans. and i don't really see them doing that. >> if the republicans say sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy, you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a time when the american economy is doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> but house speaker john bigger is digging in
as well. >>> topt get right to it. the big battle over the fiscal cliff getting increasingly contentious. as we know, time is running out. just 27 days to go until more than $500 billion in automatic spending cuts and tax hikes actually kick in. now, the president, he is standing firm saying there's not going to be a deal medicals taxes for the wealthiest americans go up. the president is offering $400 billion in cuts from entitlements, but he also wants to spend $50 billion more on infrastructure. go to house speaker john boehner. he is offering $800 billion in increased revenue. he also wants much deeper cuts in entitlements and $800 billion in other cuts many spending. we've got reporters -- i want to start off with you. dana bash on the hill. a standoff here, republicans essentially saying, look, the president is not being reasonable here, and then you have the white house saying this is magic beans and fairy dust. is this a lot of posturing here? are we really at an impasse? >> yes to both of those questions. there is a lot of post urg, but we do seem to be at an impasse. i want to
to be operating. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we should be work together across the aisle to address issues like we are today with the defense authorization bill but also other critical issues, including tax issues and spending issues and that's what i wanted to address today. we -- we have a lot of challenges and instead of pulling together, we seem to be pulling apart. and i'm specifically referring to some of the suggestions by some in the majority that we consider controversial and partisan rule changes that would marginalize minority members and doing it in a way that breaks the current rules to change the rules. and what i mean by that is, it takes 67 votes to change a rule here in the united states sena senate. that's a rule, by the way, that dates back to 1917. and the reason that's in place is because obviously, you know, folks wanted to force the majority and the minority to work together to make those rule changes. you don't get a two-thirds vote without that. and i think that's important, that the basic rules are ones that are agreed on. we tend to change parties a lot around he
as i do not want to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. and remember, the good will, the piece that is, i think, determinive here, the speakers put new revenues on the table just after the election and said we get it. the president won his re-election. we wonelection. >> they know they need to put revenant on the table, but will and give them the entitlement cuts? >> we will take this as a serious matter. this is not a game. we are interested in trying to solve the problem for the american people so that we do not see taxes go up on anybody, so we can engage in reform, get the economy going again. we're not playing a game. that offer yesterday was not serious. thank you. >> that was a portion of a briefing held earlier today. eric cantor talked about a bill that the house pass today that creates a new visa program. the vote was 245-139. the house is adjourned for the week, but members return at noon on m
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)